We love using silk film for keeping foam dry and to help easily fit foam inside cushion covers. However, sometimes silk film can trap too much air inside your cushion and balloon up when you sit on it. Today we’re sharing a quick tip on how to solve that problem.

Quick Tip: How to Stop Silk Film from Ballooning

First, let’s talk a little bit about silk film. It is a noiseless, light plastic material that acts as a water barrier between cushion foam and fabric. Silk Film is specially formulated to be silent under your cushion fabric so you won’t even know it is there.

It’s also used for shrinking foam so it can be easily inserted into the cushion cover during fabrication. Just cover and tuck the film loosely around the foam and insert a vacuum hose into a small opening in the film and place it right up against the foam. Turn the vacuum on and the foam will shrink up to 70% its normal size. Then you can place the foam into the cushion cover. When you turn off the vacuum, the foam will go back to its regular size.

To serve this purpose, the silk film blocks airflow. This only becomes a problem in a cushion if the film is wrapped around a cushion too thoroughly and the foam easily compresses. Then what happens is when you sit on the cushion, all the air is squeezed out of the foam and has nowhere to go, so it fills the silk film and causes an awkward ballooning. It’s an annoying problem but one that’s easy to fix.

Quick Tip: How to Stop Silk Film from Ballooning

Leave a 1-2 inch tall gap in the silk film along the full width of the cushion. You could do this along the zipper or on the underside of the cushion. This gives a space for the air to escape, but it won’t compromise your moisture barrier because it’s only a small space in an area that is less likely to get wet. That’s all there is to  it!

You can find silk film to keep your cushions dry at Sailrite.com.

Have you ever had your silk film balloon like this? Share your experiences using silk film in the comments!

If you’re into whimsical housewares, you’re going to love today’s project! There’s not much fun about doing the laundry, so to make the chore a little cheerier, why not carry your laundry in a fish-shaped bag?

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

We made our fish-shaped laundry bag with one craft pack of Oly*Fun Fabric. A really fun feature of this fabric is that you can draw on it with markers, paint on it, and even use glue to easily add embellishments. We made our fish bag look a little more fish-like by hot gluing an eye on each side that we made out of scrap fabric. You could also glue or draw on scales!

Let’s take a closer look at how to put together this simple-sew project.

Materials List:

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

How to Make a Fish Shaped Laundry Bag

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

We started by drawing out our fish shape on a piece of muslin. You could sketch out your fish design on patterning material, newspaper or kraft paper. Our fish measures about 37” from tail tip to the top of the bag (aka the mouth) and is about 20” wide. You can make your fish whatever size you want, just sketch out a design that’s pleasing to you.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Roll out your Oly*Fun but leave the fabric folded in half. Lay your pattern on top of the Oly*Fun and pin them together.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Cut out the fish shape in the Oly*Fun.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Mark 3” down from the top of the bag on each edge and make a tiny snip with your scissors.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Top stitch 1/4” away from the raw edge all the way around the bag, starting at the snip you made in the last step and finishing at the opposite snip.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Sew a second row of stitches alongside the first to strengthen the seam.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

At the top of the bag, widen the snip you made earlier in the fabric so it’s the width of your stitches.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Take the fabric above the cut you just made and fold it in 1/2”. Then, fold the top down to create a 1-3/4” hem.

Cut your length of leechline in half. Fold the leechline into the top hem. Arrange the line so it wraps around one edge of the bag and its free ends stick out from the opposite side. Do the same with the second half of the leechline, but adding the loop at the opposite side of the bag.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Fold up the top hem and pin in place.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Loosely tie the free ends of the rope on each side. Take to the sewing machine and sew 1/4” away from the bottom folded edge all around the top of the bag. Be sure to keep the ties out of the way while you sew! Then sew a second row of stitches above the first.

How to Make a Fish-Shaped Laundry Bag

Tie a nice small knot at the end of the line.

Now you can decorate or embellish you fish!


You can find everything you need to make your own fish-shaped laundry bag at Sailrite.com.

Would you want to make fish bags? What other projects would you make with Oly*Fun fabric? Get more inspiration for small projects like this on our Scrap Busters & Small Projects board on Pinterest.

Spray adhesives are great for installing headliner, gluing batting to foam, basting sailcloth, crafting and much more. We love how handy these adhesives are, but they also can be really messy. Today we’re going to share our tips for keeping the can nozzles clean and your home or boat clear of sticky overspray.

Managing the Overspray

How to Clean Spray Adhesives

When possible, lay out newspaper or kraft paper underneath the area you will be spraying. This will help keep the overspray off your surfaces. In the Sailrite Loft we have a table with walls on three sides that’s lined with kraft paper to protect our main table from sticky residue.

If you are working on a project that doesn’t allow you to paper off your area, like if you’re adding headliner to your boat’s cabin for example, you can easily clean off any overspray with 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner. Use the cleaner on a rag and wipe down any surfaces that might have excess glue on them. This cleaner is safe to use on dried paint, vinyl and fabric.

Keeping the Nozzle Clear

How to Clean Spray Adhesives

It’s easy for excess adhesive to dry and block the nozzle on the can of spray adhesives. To get the most use out of your can, you’ll want to keep your nozzle clean. To start, when you are done using the spray adhesive hold the can upside down and spray until just air comes out of the can. This helps spray out any excess glue that may clog your spray nozzle.

If you already have a clog, don’t worry! Pull the spray tip off of the can and soak it in a small pool of 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner or Goo Gone for up to an hour. These solutions should work off the glue residue. Then you can rinse off the tip and add it back to your spray adhesive can.

Another trick for this is to remove the nozzle and spray McLube Sailkote through the bottom of the nozzle, like in the photo above. McLube Sailkote is really a dry lubrication, but we’ve found that it’s surprisingly good at removing adhesive from fabric and hard surfaces.

Hopefully these quick tips will help you feel more confident using spray adhesives.

Shop our selection of spray adhesive for your next project at Sailrite.com.

Have you ever had problems with overspray or clogged nozzles on spray adhesives? How did you solve them? Share your experiences in the comments!

Unwind at the end of the day with a glass of wine and friendly conversation. With this simple wine tote you can easily take your wine to a neighbor’s boat or house. We designed this padded tote to conveniently carry two bottles of wine (or liquor if that’s your preference) to wherever sundowners are being had. We’re going to share the full step-by-step tutorial with you today.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

We made our wine tote using Oly*Fun Multi-Purpose fabric. This non-woven fabric is great for this project because it’s durable, water-resistant and lightweight. It’s also really affordable and is easy to decorate. We left our tote pretty plain, but you can draw on Oly*Fun with markers or paint right on it.

For the padding in our tote we added 1/4” polyurethane foam with a fabric backing. The backing on this foam allows you to sew through it, which makes it really great for padding in projects like this.

One craft pack of Oly*Fun and one yard of sew foam will make two wine totes. Let’s break down the step-by-step for making this wine tote.

Oly*Fun Wine Tote Materials List:

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

1. Un-roll and unfold your Oly*Fun so that you have two layers of fabric on top of each other.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

2. To create the bottom of the bag, take a wine bottle and set it on your fabric. Trace half of the shape of the bottle onto your fabric. Measure over 11” and trace half the bottle again. Connect the lines.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

3. Add a 1/2” all the way around the shape outlined. Cut out both layers of fabric together at the 1/2” line.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

4. Cut a piece of foam to match the bottom fabric. Then, layer the three bottom pieces so the foam is in between the two pieces of Oly*Fun.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

5. Take the assembly to the sewing machine and sew around the perimeter 1/4” away from the raw edge.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

6. Fold the base in half and mark the center with pins or chalk.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

7. Using a soft tape measure, follow your stitches and measure the perimeter of the bottom piece. Use this measurement to pattern the width of your side panels.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

8. Cut two pieces of Oly*Fun for the side panels using the perimeter of the base as your width (ours was 27”) and a length of 10”.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

9. Next, cut a 3” x 20” piece of Oly*Fun for the handle of your tote.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

10. Cut a piece of sew foam that is 1 inch smaller in each direction than you side pieces of Oly*Fun. Our sew foam dimensions were 26” x 9”.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

11. Lay the foam between the two body pieces of Oly*Fun so that the foam lines up flush with the fabric at one long edge. This edge will be the bottom. Pin the assembly together.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

12. Find and mark the center of the body piece. Then find and mark the halfway point between the center line and the short edge of the fabric on each side of center.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

13. Take the body piece to the sewing machine and stitch down each marked line as well as across the bottom of the piece, 1/4” away from the raw edge.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

14. Fold the body piece in half width-wise and pin the open end together. This should make your piece a circle. Then sew a row of stitches down the pinned side.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

15. Turn the top, un-sewn edge of the body piece down towards the wrong side of the fabric 1” and pin in place. Do this all the way around the top. When pinning, be sure the side seam is lying flat before you fold the top over. This will help the seam lay nicer inside your bag.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

16. Stitch the top fold in place with one row of stitches 1/4” away from the raw edge. Just above the first row sew a second row of stitches.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

17. Now it’s time to attach the base. Line up the center of the base with the two center seam lines on the body. Pin the base to the body with the right sides together. To fit the body around the curve of the base, you can snip relief notches in the seam allowance of the side piece.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

18. Sew a 1/2” seam allowance around the base of the bag.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

19. Turn the bag right side out.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

20. Next, make the handle. Take your handle piece of fabric, fold it in half lengthwise, and crease the fold.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

21. Open the fabric back up and fold each side in to meet the crease in the center of the fabric. Fold the entire piece in half again lengthwise and pin.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

22. Sew a row of stitches down each long side of the handle piece.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

23. Pin the end of the handle in place on the front, in side of the bag. The front is the side opposite the splayed out seam with the visible top stitching. Sew the handle in place to secure. Sew in line with the top stitching on the bag for a clean look.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

24. Lay the back seam against the front seam. Tuck the base of the bag up in between the seams and pin it all together.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

25. Sew from the base of the bag to the top and stitching in the ditch (directly on top of the back seam).

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

26. On the back of the bag, place a pin 2-1/4” away from the center seam. Pin the free side of the handle just on the other side of that pin.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

27. Fold the two sides of the bag together so the handle you just pinned is in the center of the bag.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

28. Where the handle and the sides all come together sew 2 rows of stitches to secure.

How to Make an Oly*Fun Wine Tote

Now you can load up your bag with wine and head out to the party!


You can find all the materials needed to make this and other bag projects at Sailrite.com.

Where would you carry your wine tote? Share your ideas in the comments!

How to Make a Boat Wheel Cover

It’s a boater’s mindset to cover and protect anything vital on board that could be damaged by the sun. Protect your boat’s steering wheel with an easy-to-sew wheel cover. We made this cover for the wheel on our Project Powerboat. This small cover adds extra sun protection for your wheel and doesn’t use much fabric, so it’s a great way to use up leftover Sunbrella.

Our wheel cover is tensioned with a sewn-in shock cord. When not on the wheel, it resembles a canvas shower cap. It is easily stretched over the wheel and stays securely in place.

This simple project is a great way to test out some trickier sewing skills like sewing boxing on a circular shape and working with shock cord. In the video you will learn how to measure your wheel for the cover, pattern the fabric, tension the shock cord and install the cover on your boat.

Materials List:

You can find all the materials you need to cover everything on your boat at Sailrite.com.

What other kinds of small covers have you made for your boat? Share you projects & ideas in the comments!

You may recognize Desiree Golen from videos we’ve shared on our Facebook page. We heard about Desiree, her boyfriend Jordan Wicht, and Project Atticus just as they were starting to refit their boat a couple of years ago. We admire their ambition and DIY spirit and we thought you would too. Sailrite is sponsoring Project Atticus as they learn how to sew canvas and sails. I recently chatted with Desiree about their ongoing adventure and the nature of DIY. Here is their story.

The DIY spirit has grabbed ahold of Desiree Golen and Jordan Wicht and it’s not letting go. This young couple is the dynamic duo behind the blog and video series, Project Atticus, where they are documenting the refit of their 1963 Allied Seawind and will ultimately share their adventures sailing around the world. The motto of Project Atticus is “know your world” and that is exactly what Desiree and Jordan intend to do.

Desiree, Jordan & Project Atticus: Seeking Knowledge & Adventure

Jordan & Desiree on the deck of Atticus, their 1963 Allied Seawind

For Desiree, the desire to travel started at a young age.

“I grew up traveling with my family and as soon as I had money of my own, I was out the door traveling again,” she said.

Desiree was working at a start-up she owned in Silicon Valley when she met a girl who crewed on super yachts. When she heard stories of traveling the world with free room and board and other great perks, Desiree could hardly believe that was a real job. She read a book about being a yacht stewardess, sold her company and moved to Fort Lauderdale to get a job on a super yacht. After working as a stewardess for 2 years, she got a job aboard Limitless, the largest American super yacht in the world. It was on board Limitless that she met Jordan, who was working there as a deck hand.

Desiree said a big attraction between her and Jordan right away was their mutual love of exploring.

“What I had always wanted to do was backpack around the world,” Desiree shared.

She hadn’t been dating Jordan long when he shared his dream to sail around the world.

“Jordan asked me to sail around the world with him and I thought, ‘hmm, let me think about that one,’” Desiree laughed.

The couple decided to test the waters and see how they traveled together by taking a trip backpacking and climbing in Southeast Asia. The trip was a success and together they decided to quit their jobs, buy a sailboat and see the world.

Desiree, Jordan & Project Atticus: Seeking Knowledge & Adventure

Celebrating their first day on board Atticus

As they were looking for a boat and preparing to start their journey, they got the idea to document their travels and their process through videos they would share online.

“We were thinking of a way to contribute back to society and to motivate ourselves to be creative,” Desiree said.

Jordan studied filmmaking in college and Desiree had worked in marketing so they pooled their skills and founded Project Atticus, a travel and adventure documentary series and blog.

“It’s really a way to document our travels and to showcase our experiences,” Desiree said.

They started on their video series right away, before they even had their vessel. In the first four of their video episodes, you can watch them search for and purchase the boat that will become Atticus.

Their boat was a diamond in the rough and needed a lot of work to make her the perfect home for Jordan and Desiree’s world expedition. They are currently deep into a complete refit of Atticus.

“It’s taken longer and is more difficult than we expected,” Desiree said of the refit.

Desiree, Jordan & Project Atticus: Seeking Knowledge & Adventure

Desiree paints the Project Atticus logo at the boatyard

The pair has been working on their boat nearly full-time for two years now, doing all the work themselves. They decided to DIY originally to save money, but have found that it has added benefits.

“[Doing the work ourselves] also makes us more capable sailors and boat owners. The feeling caught and now we do everything for the boat ourselves,” Desiree said. “It’s cool to have the empowerment to do things that people think you can’t do.”

Projects on their list included making curtains for their cabin, as well as sewing new settee and v-berth cushions. While looking for v-berth cushions online, Desiree found Sailrite’s How to Make V-Berth Cushions Video and decided to try her hand at sewing. She got an Ultrafeed Sewing Machine, Sunbrella fabric and set to work on her first project—curtains.

“I was super anxious for sewing and I was intimidated by the machine at first,” Desiree admits.

But after her first project, Desiree started to feel differently about her machine.

“I used to enjoy the prepping more, but now I enjoy the sewing more,” she said, describing sewing now as being almost a tranquil, zen-like feeling.

After completing her curtains and new settee cushions for their saloon, Desiree is now working on the v-berth cushions, which is purposely saved for her third project because she knew they’d be tricky. After that she’d like to make a sail, a sail cover and an awning for their cockpit.

While doing her canvaswork Desiree has learned that “there is a lot of finesse in sewing” but she loves the pride that comes from completing her projects.

“It’s cool that I really only know the bare minimum about sewing but I can make functional lifestyle projects,” she said.

Desiree, Jordan & Project Atticus: Seeking Knowledge & Adventure

Look at that Ultrafeed love!

She has also been really pleased with her Ultrafeed Sewing Machine.

“I love it,” she said. “It’s like having a MacBook Pro. It’s reliable and strong. My favorite part is the Sailrite videos. I can take it right out of the box without having to call anyone for help.”

Desiree advises other new sewers to find a mentor, an individual or a group, to ask questions of during the process. She found a lot of help from Sailrite and the Facebook groups “The Sailrite Users Group” and “Sewing On Boats.”

“Get a seam ripper,” she added, laughing. “Don’t be intimidated to do things over again to get them right. Also gorge on Sailrite videos.”

After two years working on their refit, Jordan and Desiree have put their hearts and souls into their boat and at time things have been really challenging.

“The emotional cost of cruising—the time you never get back—that’s the hardest part,” Desiree said. “When we’re just working and working and not sailing and not living a beautiful dream.”

Desiree, Jordan & Project Atticus: Seeking Knowledge & Adventure

Desiree’s finished curtains & settee cushions

Desiree thinks that throughout their refit they have learned valuable skills both about their boat and about life that will help them on their adventure. They’ve had to take odd jobs and learn how to sustain their dream financially (neither is independently wealthy) but Desiree now feels that they will be able to make money anywhere they go to maintain their lifestyle.

“It’s made us more self-reliant and more resourceful. We’re also better at managing expectations,” she said of their refit. “It’s made us more humble about learning and that to learn, you have to fail.”

All in all both Jordan and Desiree feel that their DIY efforts have been well worth it.

“Jordan and I have been talking a lot about the pros and cons of DIY,” Desiree said. “We realized that even though sometimes you spend the same amount of money, we are the kind of people who like to know how to do things for ourselves. The amount of happiness it brings is worth knowing.”

And it’s that same love of knowledge that lead them to this adventure in the first place. That drive to see things for themselves and to truly “know their world.”


You can follow along with Jordan and Desiree through their video updates and their blog posts. Visit their website, ProjectAtticus.com to see and learn more.

Pack up your towels, snacks, sunscreen and all your other weekend boating essentials in an extra-large tote bag you sew yourself! This bag is fun and easy to make and is handy to have around when bringing gear to and from your boat. We’re going to show you how to make one for yourself!

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

For our bag we used a new fabric, Fairfield’s Oly*Fun Multi-Purpose Fabric. This fabric is a lightweight polypropylene material that is similar to the material used for re-usable grocery bags. Oly*Fun is water-resistant, machine washable and has edges that don’t fray. It can be sewn, glued, stapled, pinned or tied and you can write on it with markers or embellish it with paint. It’s perfect for everything from bags to kids’ crafts and so much more! This is a material that can really unleash your creativity. Each craft pack of Oly*Fun is 20 inches wide and 3 yards long.

We wanted to make a functional bag using only 1 craft pack of Oly*Fun and we came up with this design, and kept things pretty simple. The bag features a zippered top and one large interior pocket. If you want a fancier design, you can use this bag as a starting point for getting more creative with customizations for your bag. For example, you could add a pocket to the inside or the outside or add color-contrasting straps. The possibilities are endless!

Tote Bag Materials:

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

How to Make an Oversized Tote Bag with Oly*Fun

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

1. Unroll your craft pack of fabric. For the main panels of your bag, cut 2 pieces that measure 20” (the full width) by 22”. We left our fabric folded in half here for ease of use, but you can un-fold it completely if you prefer.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

2. Cut a piece of fabric that measures 7” by 64” (which should be all the length that’s left of the Oly*Fun). This is your bag’s boxing.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

3. Then cut a piece of fabric measuring 4” x the remainder of the length for the straps. Then cut that piece in half lengthwise.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

4. On the long side of the main bag panels, fold down two inches and pin in place to make a 20” x 20” square.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

5. Take the strap pieces and fold them in thirds widthwise. Pin in place.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

6. Take the strap pieces to the sewing machine and sew down each long edge of the straps about one presser foot’s width away from the edge.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

7. Sew two rows of stitches along the top fold of your main bag pieces.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

8. Measure four inches in from either side of the bag tops (the side you just sewed) and pin your straps in place.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

9. Sew the straps down using a box stitch. You can make an “X” in your box or just diagonal.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

10. To create a zipper stop, cut a scrap piece of fabric about 2” x 5”. Fold it in half and then in half again, sandwiching the zipper in the center. Pin in place on the end of the zipper. Sew the stop in place by stitching along the open edge, across the width of the zipper.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

11. Pin the zipper to the wrong sides of the bag panels, leaving about 4 inches of the zipper (the end with the stop) hanging off one end of the bag. We only left 2 inches of the zipper in our photo, but 4 inches would have worked better.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

12. Install your zipper slider and cut the open end of the zipper so it’s even with the end of your bag.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

13. Place a pin 1 inch in from the side of your bag that has the open zipper. Fold half of the zipper back at that point on the bag. Repeat this process on the opposite side of the bag.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

14. Once you have everything pinned in place, use a zipper foot on your sewing machine to sew the zipper to the top of your bag. Sew right next to the zipper teeth on each side of the bag. Stop sewing 1 inch from the closed end of the zipper. Sew a second row of stitches next to the first to reinforce the top. Be sure to keep your handles out of the way when sewing the zipper!

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

15. Find the center of the bottom of your bag on each side as well as the center of your boxing piece.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

16. Match up the center points and pin the boxing in place around the bag. Clip a relief notch in the corners of the boxing if necessary to smoothly make the turn. Leave the excess at the top as is for now.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

17. Fold down the excess at the top of the boxing so it lines up with the top of the bag. Stitch it in place with two rows of stitching to match the rest of the bag top.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

18. Stitch around the three sides of the bag to attach the boxing.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

19. Unzip the bag and turn it right side out.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

20. Flatten out the inside seam and pin it flat in place. Then sew around row of stitches on top of the flat seam. When you reach the bottom corners of the bag, stop 1/2” away and backstitch. Turn the corner and start sewing a new seam 1/2” away from the corner.

How to Make an Oversize Tote Bag

21. Optional last step: We didn’t like the way our zipper stop looked so we trimmed the excess width of the fabric and added another half circle of stitches for a cleaner look.

Now all that’s left to do is fill your bag up with goodies and head out for the weekend!


We have more tutorials for fun ways you can use Oly*Fun fabric coming up on the blog in the next couple weeks. Be sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss a post!

You can find all the materials needed to make this tote bag at Sailrite.com.

What would you make with Oly*Fun fabric? Share your ideas in the comments. We might just create a how-to based on your suggestions!

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